Tuesday, 7 May 2019

DESTIN WP3 TOOLKIT - LEARNING OUTCOMES ONE



WP3 European Curriculum Design TOOLKIT

Learning Outcomes ONE: What are Learning Outcomes?

Learning Outcomes are statements of the minimum of what is expected that the student will be able to do as a result of a learning activity (Jenkins and Unwin, 2001). They are an explicit description of what a learner should know, understand and be able to do as a result of learning (Bingham, 1999). And must focus on what the student needs to achieve to attain a passing standard. Rather than the content of what has been taught.

       
Programme learning outcomes are statements of the minimum a learner is expected to know, understand or be able to do on successful completion of the entire study programme.

In European Curriculum Design, it is usual for there to be a small number of Programme Learning Outcomes. In Ireland in 2019, it is usual for a study programme to have 10 to 15 Programme Learning Outcomes. In the UK, 8 Programme Learning Outcomes are now the norm.

Finally - Programme Learning Outcomes should be written in plain, simple language. They should be easily understood by an APPLICANT to your study programme.

Stage learning outcomes are statements of the minimum a learner is expected to know, understand or be able to do on successful completion of a particular stage (or year) of the programme. Each year of your study programme may have its own set of stage learning outcomes

Module learning outcomes are statements of the minimum the learner is expected to be able to do on successful completion of the module in order to demonstrate their knowledge, understanding, skills and/or competences.

Learning outcomes inform potential candidates and employers about the programme and ensure consistency of outcomes across subjects and disciplines.

Learning outcomes:

-        Guide students in their learning, in that they explain what is expected of them
-        Are statements of what is expected that the student will be able to do as a result of a learning activity (Jenkins and Unwin, 2001)
-        Are an explicit description of what a learner should know, understand and be able to do as a result of learning (Bingham, 1999)
-        Must focus on what the student needs to achieve to attain a passing standard. Rather than the content of what has been taught.
-        Assist in the design of appropriate learning, teaching and assessment strategies
-        Focus on student behaviour and use specific action verbs to describe what students are expected to do


1.     A Learning Outcomes Approach to Higher Education:  Some Principles


1.     Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have the autonomy and responsibility for defining their own objectives and deriving from them coherent and clear graduate attributes. Study programmes are designed and provided by establishing associated learning outcomes which should be in line with the mission statement and profile of the HEI including its regional context.

2.     The internal quality management of a higher education institution must be designed to support a learning outcomes-based approach to educational provision.

3.     A commitment to a learning outcomes-based quality management approach enables the alignment of learning outcomes of study programmes to outcomes defined in a National Qualifications Framework (or in its absence to the EQF or the Dublin Descriptors).

4.     The achievement of learning outcomes is central to the contemporary quality approach; teaching and the whole study environment must be student-centred, which means that student needs and students’ learning have to be the point of reference for every quality standard.

5.     Learning outcomes of study programmes should be aligned with the national (education system, sociological specificities etc.), legal (stipulations by competent bodies such as ministries etc.) and socio-economic environment (needs of society and persons for work) and where relevant any professional, regulatory or statutory body (PRSB) at national or international level.

6.     The use of the learning outcomes enables clear distinctions to be made around a study programme’s qualification, e.g. Bachelor/Master, or a study programme’s orientation, e.g. vocational or academic.

7.     The establishment of learning outcomes for a study programme can assist in making international comparisons between programmes.

8.     The number of learning outcomes set for a full study programme is typically limited between 8 and 15.

9.     Each module/unit on a study programme also has defined learning outcomes which are also designated at an NQF level. Not all modules are required to be at the same level as the award level, e.g. if there are 24 modules units on a EQF Level 6 Bachelor programme, it is probable that some of those modules will be at lower levels, e.g. 4 or 5.

10.  Each module/unit and programme is given an appropriate credit weighting reflecting workload of both contact hours and independent study.

11.  Each study programme and each module/unit requires a distinct assessment strategy which is fair, valid and reliable and makes use of both formative and summative assessment, retaining a commitment to assessment for learning.

12.  A student’s potential to achieve an intended learning outcome is mediated through the provision of the study programme, i.e. the mode, the teaching and learning environment, human and physical resources, curriculum and essentially the assessment, etc., all of which must be verified as being fit for purpose, through a transparent quality management process.

13.  Learning outcomes and associated curriculum adapted to the NQF or the Dublin descriptors demands that more attention is given to generic competences (soft skills), research activities (final work) and internationalisation than is typically the case at the moment in the more traditional study programmes.




6 page 2019 UNIS pdf 'Guidelines on Writing Learning Outcomes'


https://www.unis.no/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/Guideline-on-writing-learning-outcomes_2019.pdf
















2 pages pf Learning Outcomes basic Principles from our Tempus ALIGN Guidelines.




www.davidquin.ie/ALIGN Guidelines - from page 7- A Learning Outcomes Approach to HE - some principles.pdf














TCD writing learning outcomes (includes a CHECKLIST) exercise (updated 2009)

https://www.tcd.ie/CAPSL/assets/pdf/Academic%20Practice%20Resources/Writing%20Learning%20Outcomes.pdf



TCD’s ‘Writing Learning Outcomes’


Prepared by Ann Lahiff, Institute of Education, University of London, 2006
Updated by Ciara O Farrell, University of Dublin, Trinity College, 2009





Up to date IADT Policy document and guidance on the use of and the writing of Learning Outcomes.

















Declan Kennedy aligning LOs with ASSESS etc Talk 2 DkIT Sept 2012


Includes Dublin Descriptors




https://www.dkit.ie/centre-learning-teaching/information-staff/learning/writing-learning-outcomes-designing-modules-learning












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